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This genus is accepted, and its native range is Central Himalaya to Nansei-shoto and Malesia.

[A-EM]
Distribution

Arachnis comprises about 14 species distributed from northeastern India and mainland Asia to Taiwan, the Ryukyu Islands, Indonesia (west of Sulawesi), and the Philippines.

Ecology

Species of Arachnis are epiphytes or lithophytes from 0 to 2000 m. Arachnis calcarata Holttum is an epiphyte on branches in lower montane forests, sometimes on ultramafic substrate, between 1100 and 2000 m in Borneo. Arachnis cathcartii (Lindl.) J.J.Sm. grows in large clusters on trees in tropical broad-leaved forests and by streams in deep cool shade between 600 and 2000 m in Bhutan. Arachnis clarkei (Rchb.f.) J.J.Sm. is lithophytic on rocks along valleys or epiphytic on tree trunks in open forests between 500 and 2100 m in China. Arachnis flos-aeris occurs in forests, often on limestone, between 300 and 900 m in Borneo. Arachnis grandisepala J.J.Wood occurs in forests at 900 m in Borneo. Arachnis hookeriana (Rchb.f.) Rchb.f. occurs in coastal scrub on sandy soil in Singapore and Malaysia. Arachnis longisepala (J.J.Wood) Shim & A.L.Lamb is found in forests on ultramafic substrates between 800 and 900 m in Borneo.

General Description

Epiphytic or lithophytic herbs. Stems branched, often to several metres long, leafy, scrambling. Leaves distichous, oblong or gradually narrowing toward apex, apex bilobed, coriaceous, base sheathing. Inflorescence lateral, often branched, ascending or pendent, few- to many-flowered. Flowers resupinate, often showy, usually widely opening, often spider-like, often fragrant. Sepals and petals similar, free, ovate or (narrowly) oblong to linear, usually widened toward apex, spreading. Lateral sepals and petals often falcate-curved. Labellum trilobed, motile, attached to the column foot by a strap of tissue, base saccate or spurred, midlobe with a raised, central ridge or callus. Column with an inconspicuous or absent foot; pollinia four, appearing as two masses, those in each pair unequal, waxy, stipe broad, viscidium broadly ovate or saddle-shaped. Capsule cylindrical.

[A-EM]
Use

Christensen (2002) reported that A. flos-aeris is used by the Iban people of Sarawak to cure toothache. Members of this genus are frequently cultivated and have been used in hybridization.

Native to:

Assam, Borneo, Cambodia, China South-Central, China Southeast, East Himalaya, Hainan, Jawa, Laos, Lesser Sunda Is., Malaya, Maluku, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Sumatera, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet, Vietnam

Extinct in:

Nansei-shoto

Arachnis Blume appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
27801.000

First published in Bijdr. Fl. Ned. Ind.: 365 (1825)

Accepted by

  • Govaerts, R. (1995). World Checklist of Seed Plants 1(1, 2): 1-483, 1-529. MIM, Deurne.
  • Govaerts, R. (2003). World Checklist of Monocotyledons Database in ACCESS: 1-71827. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Pridgeon, A.M., Cribb, P.J., Chase, M.C. & Rasmussen, F.N. (2014). Genera Orchidacearum 6: 1-544. Oxford University Press, New York, Oxford.

Aeridinae: e-monocot.org
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Herbarium Catalogue Specimens

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0