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This genus is accepted, and its native range is E. Australia.

[A-EM]
Ecology

Rhinerrhiza divitiflora is epiphytic on tree trunks or occasionally lithophytic, common and widespread in rain forests, open forests, and sheltered areas at 0–1200 m.

General Description

(Plate 103; Fig. 679.1) Epiphytic herbs. Roots scabrous, rasp-like, broad, flat, grey. Stem usually a single growth, occasionally up to 10 cm long, erect, horizontal or pendent, the portion below the leaves covered with the imbricate scarious remains of the leaf-sheaths. Leaves 3–6, oblong or narrowly oblong, apex acute or oblique, margins sometimes undulate, coriaceous, smooth or harsh and dry to the touch, sometimes strongly suffused with purple. Inflorescence many-flowered, pendent, the flowers opening in one or a few episodes, simultaneously or in groups, fugaceous; peduncle shorter than rachis; floral bracts minute. Flowers resupinate, short-lived (1–3 days), usually opening widely, pale orange with red spots and blotches, labellum white, or ochre-yellow irregularly and heavily blotched and spotted brown. Sepals and petals free, subsimilar and usually of equal length, spatulate or almost filiform. Labellum hinged to apex of column foot, trilobed, spurred, side lobes erect, incurved and overlapping each other at distal end but not enclosing column, midlobe situated at top of base of spur, tooth-like, disc with three calli, a central centrally grooved one and a tooth-like one at base of and joined to each side lobe opposite central callus; spur situated at distal end of labellum, hollow, obtuse, broader than deep. Column with foot set at an acute angle with column proper; anther cap with a beak, pollinia four, in two closely appressed subequal pairs sessile on stipe, viscidium oblong or subobovate; stigma deeply set; rostellum composed of two widely separated, decurved, toothlike arms.

Distribution

Rhinerrhiza is monospecific and confined to Australia (northeastern Queensland, northern New South Wales).

[A-EM]
Use

No uses have been reported for Rhinerrhiza except in horticulture, where it imparts its yellow colour in intergeneric crosses, often with Sarcochilus to provide longer-lasting flowers. It is occasionally cultivated.

Native to:

New South Wales, Queensland

Rhinerrhiza Rupp appears in other Kew resources:

First published in Vict. Naturalist 67: 206 (1951)

Accepted by

  • Govaerts, R. (2003). World Checklist of Monocotyledons Database in ACCESS: 1-71827. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Pridgeon, A.M., Cribb, P.J., Chase, M.C. & Rasmussen, F.N. (2014). Genera Orchidacearum 6: 1-544. Oxford University Press, New York, Oxford.

Aeridinae: e-monocot.org
All Rights Reserved

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0